TRUMP ON BANNON ARREST: ‘Sad’ But ‘Nothing To Do With Me’

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Thursday reacted to the arrest of Steve Bannon, who once served as one of the president’s closest advisors.

“I haven’t been dealing with him for a long period of time as most of the people in the room know,” Trump told reporters. “He was involved in our campaign. He worked for a lot of companies, but he was involved likewise in our campaign and for a small part of the administration, very early on. I haven’t been dealing with him at all.”

Bannon and three other individuals, Brian Kolfage, Andrew Badolato, and Timothy Shaw, were arrested early Thursday on charges that they had “orchestrated a scheme to defraud hundreds of thousands of dollars” in connection with the “We Build The Wall” online fundraising campaign.

Authorities allege the foursome used hundreds of thousands of dollars from a crowdfunding campaign that raised more than $25 million to build a wall along the U.S. southern border for their own purposes.

“I know nothing about the project other than I didn’t like when I read about it, I didn’t like it,” Trump said. “I said this is for government, this isn’t for private people. It sounded to me like showboating. I think I let my opinion be very strongly stated at the time I didn’t like it. It was showboating and maybe looking for funds…I don’t know that he was in charge. I don’t know any of the other people either.”

“I don’t think that should be a privately financed wall,” the president added. “It’s too complex and too big.

When asked by reporters about others from his 2016 presidential campaign who have since been arrested and convicted, including former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, campaign manager Paul Manafort, attorney Michael Cohen and confidant Roger Stone, Trump lashed back.

“They spied on our campaign illegally and if you look at all of the things and all of the scandals they had, they had tremendous lawlessness.”

Judge Demands Details Surrounding Trump’s Clemency of Stone

WASHINGTON– A federal judge on Monday challenged President Donald Trump’s decision to commute the prison sentence ofRoger Stone.

Stone, a long time ally of Trump, was convicted as part of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian collusion in the 2016 presidential election. Stone was convicted of multiple charges, including making false statements, witness tampering and obstruction of justice. The 67-year-old received notice Friday evening that his 40-month prison sentence was commuted by Trump, just days before he was scheduled to report to prison.

U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson — who presided over Stone’s trial last year, issued order that a copy of Trump’s executive order commuting Stone be provided to her no later than Tuesday.

She also asked for clarification as to the scope of the clemency, including whether Trump’s order was specific to Stone’s prison sentence or also includes the two-year period of supervised release that was ordered as part of his sentence.

STONE GETS HARD TIME: Trump adviser Roger Stone sentenced to 40 months

WASHINGTON — Trump ally Roger Stone was sentenced to 40 months in federal prison Thursday for making what prosecutors said were false statements to investigators regarding the Trump-Russia probe.

Prosecutors had suggested that Stone, 67, serve nine years.

U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson, while sentencing Stone, said the prison term originally sought by federal prosecutors was “too excessive.”

“Mr. Stone lied,” Jackson said, denying allegations put forth by Stone’s defense team that he had been persecuted for his conservative stance. “He was not prosecuted, as some have claimed, for standing up for the president. He was prosecuted for covering up for the president.”

Stone, who was convicted in November on seven counts of obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress on charges that stemmed from former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, chose not to speak on his own behalf during the sentencing.

President Trump took quickly to Twitter following Stone’s sentencing, blasting the decision as politically motivated.

“’They say Roger Stone lied to Congress.’ @CNN. OH, I see, but so did Comey (and he also leaked classified information, for which almost everyone, other than Crooked Hillary Clinton, goes to jail for a long time), and so did Andy McCabe, who also lied to the FBI! FAIRNESS?” he tweeted.

The sentence is a far cry from the probation sought by Stone’s defense team, who cited their client’s age and lack of criminal history.

Stone was the sixth Trump aide to be convicted of charges brought as part of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into possible Russian collusion during the 2016 presidential election.

In addition to his sentence, Roger Stone was fined $20,000 and given restrictions on travel pending his defense team’s motion for a new trial over claims of juror bias. Stone remains free on bond pending the outcome of the motion.

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‘NOT GUILTY’: Roger stone enters plea in Mueller probe

WASHINGTON — Roger Stone pleaded not guilty Tuesday to felony charges of obstruction, giving false statements and witness tampering relating to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s ongoing investigation into Russian collusion during the 2016 presidential election.

Stone, a longtime adviser and confidant of President Donald Trump, was arrested early Friday morning after a grand jury for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia indicted him on one count of obstruction of an official proceeding, one count of witness tampering and five counts of making false statements.

Looking somber, the usually outspoken Stone was uncharacteristically quiet throughout his appearance and spoke only when spoken to by the judge overseeing the hearing.

Released Friday on a $250,000 signature bond, Stone responded, “Yes, Your Honor,” as U.S. Magistrate Judge Deborah Robinson asked if he would agree to the conditions of his release.

Restricted to traveling only to his home in Florida, Stone was instructed to refrain from contacting any potential witnesses in the case and his passport has been seized.

Shortly after the hearing Stone was whisked away in a black SUV, but smiled and waved to supporters gathered outside the courthouse, many holding signs reading “Free Stone Jail Hillary” and “Free Stone Fire Mueller”.

During an appearance Sunday on ABC’s “This Week” Stone denied any wrongdoing and claimed the charges levied against him were politically motivated.

“All I did was take publicly available information and try to hype it to get it as much attention as possible, because I had a tip, the information was politically significant and that it would come in October,” Stone said of his promoting leaked DNC documents made available to the public by Wikileaks. “That’s what I engaged in. It’s called politics and they haven’t criminalized it, at least not yet.”

Under federal sentencing guidelines, Stone could face up to 24 to 30 months in prison if convicted.

Another status hearing in Stone’s case is scheduled for Friday, February 1.

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ROGER STONE: Behold the ‘treachery’ that is Steve Bannon

WASHINGTON (The Daily Caller) — The Washington Post reported that former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon testified for the Grand Jury yesterday regarding his communications with me regarding the Wikileaks disclosures in October 2016.

The Special Counsel is reportedly probing whether I somehow directed or urged Wikileaks to release the allegedly hacked e-mails from the DNC in the wake of the Billy Bush accusations against Trump on Oct. 7. I did not — and there is no evidence to the contrary. In fact, Wikileaks Publisher Julian Assange announced his release schedule on Oct. 2.

When Assange held a press event Oct. 2 (Oct. 3 U.S. time) and did not release any documents that day as had been widely expected, Bannon e-mailed me asking why.

I had long predicted an October release based on Assange’s June 2016 CNN interview with Anderson Cooper in which he said he had a trove of documents on Hillary and would release them. I had been told this would come in October for months by my source Randy Credico who I identified for the House Intelligence committee.

Then Bannon (or his hatchet man Sam Nunberg) leaked this e-mail exchange to the various media outlets.

The source of Assange’s Security Concerns came from Credico

On March 9, 2018, I wrote on Stone Cold Truth:

When Assange made no disclosures on October 1st, Alex Jones was among those publicly m*therfucking Assange for losing his nerve. Credico told me that Assange had demurred on October 1st because of the concerns of one of his lawyers, Daniel Ellsberg, about threats to Assange’s life if he went forward with the disclosures. Remember, Hillary Clinton actually advocated the use of a drone strike to kill Assange in London, in order to prevent the disclosure of what she knew he had.

Credico told me that Secretary of State John Kerry had astonishingly gone to British Prime Minister Teresa May and asked that Britain rescind its diplomatic recognition of Ecuador for one day, stripping Assange of his asylum, so that United and British authorities could storm the Embassy and seize Assange …

Credico predicted that Assange “would do the right thing” and in fact Assange announced the schedule of a serious of forthcoming disclosures in his October 2nd remarks, which was little noticed by the press. He would follow this schedule to devastating effect.

More importantly my prediction of “a load every week going forward” is based on Assange’s own public announcement hours before-that there would be weekly releases going through and beyond the election and not any communication with Wikileaks or Assange. Politico reported this.

When Bannon’s minion Matt Boyle asked me if what Assange had was “good” I replied it was, based on Credico’s insistence the material was “devastating,” “bombshell” and would “change the race.” This turned out to be right, although — as I have testified — I never knew the content or source of the Wikileaks disclosures in advance.

Bannon’s animus toward me stems from a column I wrote for the Daily Caller arguing that he had outlived his usefulness in the Trump White House and should be fired. The next day, he was.

Bannon also told the Washington Post that the idea to bring the woman victims to the debate was his while the paper trail tells a very different story.

If the Grand Jury was told that either of my comments to Bannon were based on anything other than information I had already attributed to my source under oath or information reported publicly that day, they were misled.

What I am guilty of is using publicly available information and a solid tip to bluff, posture, hype and punk Democrats on Twitter. This is called “politics.” It’s not illegal.

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TIPPING THE SCALES: CONSERVATIVES PREPARE FOR ANOTHER POSSIBLE SCOTUS CONFIRMATION AMID REPORTS KENNEDY WILL RESIGN

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Just weeks after Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch faced a scathing confirmation battle, reports have surfaced that conservative justice Anthony Kennedy is preparing to resign.

Speaking on today’s Alex Jones show, political strategist Roger Stone, a Trump insider, said sources close to the Trump administration have confirmed the recent rumors on the jurist’s plans to retire (https://www.infowars.com/roger-stone-resignation-of-justice-kennedy-imminent-exclusive-from-white-house/).

“I don’t know. I have a lot of respect for Justice Kennedy, but I just don’t know,” president Trump said, when asked about the rumors of Kennedy’s departure. “I don’t like talking about it. I’ve heard the same rumors that a lot of people have heard. And I have a lot of respect for that gentleman, a lot.”

Last month, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley hinted of another resignation this summer, but played coy in when it came to who may be stepping down.

“I have no way of knowing who it is, it’s just a very general rumor for the last six months around Washington, DC and I assume it’s somebody in their late seventies or early eighties,” Grassley said.

The conservative Kennedy, who was nominated by President Ronald Reagan, has often been the tie breaker when it comes to some of the court’s most hotly contested cases and has ruled on the bench since November 11, 1987.

The news has worked Republicans into an uproar in regard to who may be Trump’s pick to replace Kennedy when the current court session ends in June.

The president’s selection will likely be pulled from his original list of 21 possible nominees, which he released prior to his pick of Gorsuch earlier this year. The likely choice, say most legal analysts, will be that of Judge Thomas Hardiman of the 3rd Circuit, who was a close runner up to Trump’s nomination of Gorsuch.

Whoever the president’s pick, the next Supreme Court nominee will not likely face the same hurdles forced upon Gorsuch.

Because the now infamous Democrat filibuster over Gorsuch’s confirmation prompted Senate Republicans to “go nuclear” by changing the rules to it easier to confirm Supreme Court justices, Democrats will have a much more difficult time in blocking the next Trump nominee. It now takes only 51 senators — a simple majority — to clear nomination once a Supreme Court nominee is presented for consideration.

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