READ THE DOCS: House Republicans Hit FBI, DOJ With Preservation Orders in Response to Trump Raid

Source: House Republicans

REPORT: DeSantis Beats Trump in 2024 Poll

WASHINGTON (Daily Caller)– Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is leading former President Donald Trump among likely Republican primary voters in New Hampshire, a poll released Wednesday shows.

DeSantis garnered 39% support in the poll of 318 likely GOP primary voters, followed by Trump with 37%. Former Vice President Mike Pence received 9% support, and former United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley garnered 6%. No other candidate mentioned in the poll, conducted by the University of New Hampshire from June 16-20, received more than 1% support. The poll had a margin of error of 5.5%, meaning that DeSantis and Trump were effectively tied.

DeSantis will likely run in the 2024 primaries, although he has said that he is solely focusing on winning re-election in November. Several straw polls have also found the Florida governor leading a hypothetical matchup with Trump. The University of New Hampshire conducted a similar poll in October 2021. That survey found Trump with 43% support and DeSantis with 18%. 

“Trump slipping in pre–primary polls is part of a typical pattern,” UNH Survey Center director Andrew Smith said in a statement accompanying the poll. “A party’s losing candidate in the prior electon is typically the best–known person in their party. As the primary gets closer, new candidates emerge and attract more media attention, and therefore more voter attention, than the losing candidate from the previous election.”

The most recent New Hampshire poll also found that DeSantis would match up better against President Joe Biden. That portion of the poll, which included 845 likely voters and a margin of error of 3.4%, found DeSantis with 47% support and Biden with 46%. In a hypothetical rematch between Biden and Trump, Biden polled at 50% support and Trump held 43%. Biden defeated Trump in the state during the 2020 election, 53-45.

Trump won the New Hampshire primary with 35% support on his way to the GOP nomination in 2016. The state has held the first election in the primary calendar since 1920, and is the second contest on the calendar after the Iowa caucuses.

BIDEN: GOP In Midst of ‘Mini Revolution’

WASHINGTON (The Hill) — President Biden said Wednesday it appears the GOP is going through a “mini-revolution” amid a public rift among House members loyal to former President Trump and those such as Republican Conference Chairwoman Liz Cheney (Wyo.) who have been sharply critical of him.

“It seems as though the Republican Party is trying to identify what it stands for. And they’re in the midst of significant sort of mini-revolution going on in the Republican Party,” Biden told reporters after giving remarks on aid for restaurants during the coronavirus pandemic.

“I’ve been a Democrat for a long time. We’ve gone through periods where we’ve had internal fights, disagreements. I don’t remember any like this,” he added. “We badly need a Republican Party. We need a two-party system. It’s not healthy to have a one-party system. And I think the Republicans are further away from trying to figure out who they are and what they stand for than I thought they would be at this point.”

Biden’s comments come as House Republicans have turned on Cheney for her repeated denunciations of Trump’s false claims about the 2020 election.

Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.), along with many rank-and-file Republicans, are moving to oust Cheney from her role as the No. 3 GOP House member.

Trump on Wednesday endorsed Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.) to replace Cheney in House GOP leadership. Stefanik, a vocal Trump ally, is viewed as the likely pick should the caucus vote to remove Cheney or should she step down. 

Biden earlier Wednesday was asked during a visit to a local restaurant about the drama surrounding Cheney and responded: “I don’t understand the Republicans.”

He and other administration officials have been adamant that they will try to work with Republicans on policy where there is mutual agreement.

The president is expected to meet next week with McCarthy and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) alongside Democratic leaders, and he will separately host Sen. Shelly Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) and other lawmakers for talks on his infrastructure proposal.

THE NOMINEE: Trump Secures Republican Nomination For Second Term As Crowd Chants ‘Twelve More Years!’

CHARLOTTE — President Donald Trump on Monday surpassed the necessary number of votes needed to secure his party’s nomination for re-election during day one of the Republican National Convention.

As the totals were announced, the president smiled as a crowd chanted, “twelve more years.”

After thanking his supporters, the president launched into a new attack at those calling for mail in voting to combat the Coronavirus pandemic.

“This is the greatest scam in the history of politics, I think, and I’m talking about beyond our nation. They act like they are aggrieved by saying this, saying such a horrible thing, we are not patriotic by saying this. No,” Trump said. “We voted during World War I. We voted at the voting booth during World War II. The pandemic we are doing very well — and people know how to handle it — look at the crowds. They are doing very well. It’s very safe.”

Earlier Monday, the convention renominated Vice President Mike Pence, who also delegates in person.

“The choice in this election has never been clearer and the stakes have never been higher,” Pence said. “We’re going to make American great again. Again.”

Despite the scaled back theme of the convention, enthusiasm was high amongst the president’s supporters.

With just 336 delegates participating in a roll-call vote from a Charlotte Convention Center ballroom, Party Chair Ronna McDaniel commented on the social distanced style of the convention before she began the proceedings: “We are obviously disappointed we could not hold this event in the same way we had originally planned,” but thanked Charlotte city officials for allowing the convention to move forward.

During her speech, McDaniel accused the president’s Democratic rival, Joe Biden, of embracing a radical left agenda and scoffed at the DNC’s efforts to present Biden as the nominee of empathy and kindness.

“The truth is there’s only one person who has empathized with everyday Americans and actually been fighting for them every single day over the past four years, and that’s President Donald J. Trump,” she said.

After the initial Charlotte festivities are over, most of the GOP convention will move to Washington, D.C. where celebrity Trump supporters and members of the Trump family will rally around the president and shift focus to the president’s accomplishments during his first term in office.

The convention will also include everyday Americans who campaign officials say have helped implement and who’s lives have been positively impacted by the president’s policies.

COVID: Trump Wars With Senate GOP Over Trillion Dollar Package

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump insisted “good things” were underway on the next COVID-19 aid package Monday as he met with Republican congressional leaders, but new divisions between the Senate GOP and the White House posed fresh challenges as the crisis worsened and emergency relief was soon expiring.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has been prepared to roll out the $1 trillion package in a matter of days. But the administration criticized more virus testing money and interjected other priorities that could complicate quick passage.

“We’ve made a lot of progress,” Trump said as the meeting got underway.

But the president acknowledged the “big flare up” of rising caseloads and deaths in the states. “Unfortunately, this is something that’s very tough,” he said.

Lawmakers were returning to a Capitol still off-limits to tourists, another sign of the nation’s difficulty containing the coronavirus. Rather than easing, the pandemic’s devastating cycle is rising again, leaving Congress little choice but to engineer another costly rescue. Businesses are shutting down again, many schools will not fully reopen and jobs are disappearing, all while federal aid will soon expire.

Without a successful federal strategy, lawmakers are trying to draft one.

“We have to end this virus,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Monday on MSNBC.

Pelosi said any attempt by the White House to block money for testing “goes beyond ignorance.”

The political stakes are high for both parties before the November election, and even more so for the nation, which now has registered more coronavirus infections and a higher death count of 140,500 than any other country.

McConnell and House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy huddled with Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and acting chief of staff Mark Meadows.

Mnuchin vowed passage by month’s end, as earlier benefits expire, and said he expected the fresh $1 trillion jolt of business tax breaks and other aid would have a “big impact” on the struggling economy.

Mnuchin said he’s preparing to start talks with Democrats. He and Meadows were headed to the Hill later to brief lawmakers.

“We can’t pass the bill in the Senate without the Democrats and we’re going to talk to them as well,” McConnell agreed.

The package from McConnell had been quietly crafted behind closed doors for weeks and was expected to include $75 billion to help schools reopen, reduced unemployment benefits and a fresh round of direct $1,200 cash payments to Americans, and a sweeping five-year liability shield against coronavirus lawsuits.

But as the administration was panning some $25 billion in proposed new funds for testing and tracing, said one Republican familiar with the discussions. Trump was also reviving his push for a payroll tax break, which was being seriously considered, said another Republican. Both spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the private talks.

Trump insisted again Sunday that the virus would “disappear,” but the president’s view did not at all match projections from the leading health professionals straining to halt the alarming U.S. caseload and death toll.

“It’s not going to magically disappear,” said a somber McConnell, R-Ky., last week during a visit to a hospital in his home state to thank front-line workers.

McConnell also faces divisions from some in his ranks who oppose more spending, and he is straining to keep the package at $1 trillion.

Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer warned Monday his side will block any effort from McConnell that falls short.

“We will stand together again if we must,” Schumer said in a letter to colleagues.

The New York Democrat is reviving his strategy from the last virus aid bill that forced Republicans to the negotiating table after McConnell’s original bill was opposed by Democrats. This time, the House has already approved Pelosi’s sweeping $3 trillion effort, giving Democrats momentum heading into negotiations.

Trump raised alarms on Capitol Hill when he suggested last month at a rally in Oklahoma that he wanted to slow virus testing. Some of Trump’s GOP allies wanted new money to help test and track the virus to contain its spread. Senate Democrats were investigating why the Trump administration had not yet spent some of $25 billion previously allocated.

The payroll tax break Trump wanted also divided his party because it historically has been used used to fund Social Security and Medicare. Cutting it only adds to the nation’s rising debt load at a time when conservatives are wary of any new spending. Some Republicans also see it as an insufficient response to millions of out-of-work Americans.

This would be the fifth virus aid package, after the $2.2 trillion bill passed in March, the largest U.S. intervention of its kind.

While many GOP hoped the virus would ease and economy rebound, it’s become clear more aid is needed as the first round of relief is running out.

A federal $600-a-week boost to regular unemployment benefits would expire at the end of the month. So, too, would the federal ban on evictions from millions of rental units.

With 17 straight weeks of unemployment claims topping 1 million — usually about 200,000 — many households are facing a cash crunch and losing employer-backed health insurance.

Despite flickers of an economic upswing as states eased stay-at-home orders in May and June, the jobless rate remained at double digits, higher than it ever was in the last decade’s Great Recession.

Pelosi’s bill, approved in May, includes $75 billion for testing and tracing to try to get a handle on the virus spread, funnels $100 billion to schools to safely reopen and calls for $1 trillion to be sent to cash-strapped states to pay essential workers and prevent layoffs. The measure would give cash stipends to Americans, and bolster rental and mortgage and other safety net protections.

In the two months since Pelosi’s bill passed, the U.S. had 50,000 more deaths and 2 million more infections.

“If we don’t invest the money now, it will be much worse,” Pelosi said.


Associated Press writers Aamer Madhani and Andrew Taylor contributed to the contents of this report.