‘UNCONSTITUTIONAL!’ Republicans Explode Over New Biden Mandatory Vaccination Mandate

WASHINGTON– In a move constitutional scholars were quick to criticize, Joe Biden issued an executive order Thursday mandating all employers within the U.S. with 100 employees or more require their employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19.

“I’m instructing the Department of Labor to require all employers with 100+ employees to ensure their workforce is fully vaccinated — or show a negative test at least once a week,” Biden tweeted.

The mandate comes as an increasing number of Americans push back against the vaccine.

The administration will also enforce fines of up to $14,000 per violation for employers that ignore these mandates, The Washington Post reported. The mandate is expected to affect more than 100 million workers.

“This is absolutely unconstitutional,” Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky, wrote in a tweet, attaching a link to the news.

“Mandates are not the answer,” Rep. Neal Dunn, R-Fla, wrote in response. “Getting the vaccine should be up to you and your doctor — not the federal government.”

“All 9 million federal employees should consult with their doctor and make a personal, informed decision about taking the vaccine,” wrote Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo. “Instead, Sleepy Joe says take it or else… You don’t lead by coercion. Biden has failed as a leader in every way.”

Recent rallies across the country have drawn increasing numbers by Americans suspicious of the Biden agenda.

One rally in San Diego drew particular interest after it was announced the protest was organized by health care workers.

Participants, calling themselves America’s Healthcare Workers for Medical Freedom, chanted the repurposed pro-abortion rights slogan “our body, our choice,” and argued that individuals, not the federal government, have the exclusive right to decide whether or not to receive the Covid-19 vaccine.

The Biden order is in direct contrast to statements he made while running for office in which he said he would not consider imposing mandatory vaccines.

“I don’t think they should be mandatory. I wouldn’t demand it to be mandatory, but I would do everything in my power just like I don’t think masks have to be made mandatory nationwide,” then candidate Biden told reporters in December of 2020.

Requests for clarification from the White House on the discrepancy were met with “no comment.”

UNITED AIRLINES CEO: ‘MANDATORY Vaccines Are Coming; Public Must Comply’

CHICAGO– United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby said Tuesday that mandatory vaccines are coming and that the public and employees alike will have no choice but to comply.

During a speaking engagement at the Economic Club of Chicago on Tuesday, Kirby pushed mandatory vaccines for employees, saying “It will just become what is expected and what most companies do.”

“Once the ball gets rolling, it’s going to roll all the way to the bottom,” Kirby said, adding that “a big second wave” of companies will mandate vaccines in a “snowball effect.”

“I’m realistic enough, while I think it’s the right thing to do, to know United Airlines alone can’t do it and have it stick. There don’t have to be a ton of others, but there have to be others,” Kirby urged.

Kirby pointed out that companies can require workers to get the vaccine under a ruling by The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, but added that he doesn’t believe that mandatory vaccines for employees alone are enough adding that he supports mandatory vaccine passports not only for air travel, but for everyday activities such as attending concerts and other public events.

“It gives people a pretty strong incentive, because that’s the way they can get their life back,” Kirby proclaimed, adding “We think it’s a key to opening not just international borders and aviation, but the economy.”

WHO WILL BLINK? White House Ups Offer to Nearly $1.9 Trillion Ahead of Tuesday Stimulus Deadline

WASHINGTON– White House Chief of staff Mark Meadows announced Monday that the White House has increased its stimulus offer as the Tuesday deadline to secure a deal before the election reaches its final hours.

“We’ve increased our offer up to almost $1.9 trillion,” Meadows told reporters on Monday morning. “[The president] is willing to give some additional money in terms of direct payments, he’s willing to give some additional money in terms of PPP to restaurants and hotels and small businesses.”

The White House announcement comes in response to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s incistence that a deal must be reached by Tuesday in order for legislation to have a chance of passing before the election. Pelosi — who spoke with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin over the weekend and is expected to talk with him again on Monday — said while there’s been progress, no deal has yet been reached.

“While there was some encouraging news, much work remains,” Pelosi said in a statement Sunday. “I am optimistic that we can reach agreement before the election.”

Pelosi, (D-CA), has proposed a $2.2 trillion package that the White House has steadfastly rejected.

DEAL OR NO DEAL? Pelosi, Mnuchin Continue COVID-19 Talks Despite Dwindling Odds

WASHINGTON (The Hill) — The top negotiators fighting for a deal on emergency coronavirus relief spoke again on Wednesday as they face increasingly dismal odds to secure an agreement before Election Day.

The hourlong phone call between Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin was a “productive” one, according to Pelosi spokesman Drew Hammill, citing a focused effort to find “clarification on language” — a reference to assurances sought by Democrats that new funding allocated by Congress will be spent on intended programs.

But a deal remains a long shot, as Democrats have held firm to their $2.2 trillion demand; Senate Republicans have balked at even the $1.8 trillion proposal from the White House; and President Trump has confused the debate with a stream of mixed messages regarding what he supports.

“One major area of disagreement continues to be that the White House lacks an understanding of the need for a national strategic testing plan,” Hammill tweeted. “The Speaker believes we must reopen our economy & schools safely & soon, & scientists agree we must have a strategic testing plan.”

Speaking at a public conference shortly after his call with Pelosi, Mnuchin noted the distinct divisions blocking a deal, emphasizing entrenched differences remain over both the amount of new spending and the policy areas it should target.

“I don’t agree with the Speaker’s approach that we have to do all or nothing,” Mnuchin said in an interview with the Milken Institute. He added that securing and executing a deal before the elections “would be difficult just given where we are and the level of detail.”

Another area of disagreement is how much aid should be extended to state and local governments, which are struggling to fund the emergency response to the pandemic while simultaneously being squeezed by a loss of tax revenue.

Democrats had proposed $436 billion in aid for those localities, while the White House countered with $300 billion. Mnuchin on Wednesday said that number marked “an extraordinary compromise” on the part of the administration, suggesting the White House is not ready to raise its offer.

Rep. Bill Foster (D-Ill.) said Democrats are also wary of how the state and local funds are allocated. He accused Republicans of manipulating the language in earlier rounds of emergency relief to ensure that red states benefited disproportionately.

“This is one place where the details matter a lot,” Foster said on a press call. “A small town in Wyoming or Montana got, I think, five times more money than a small town in Illinois.”

Another sticking point surrounds GOP demands for language protecting businesses and schools from liability if workers or students contract the virus — a demand Mnuchin amplified Wednesday.

Democrats are insisting that those liability protections be excluded, and appear equally unyielding in that demand.

“I think that it should be a dealbreaker for us to leave it in there,” said Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.). “We have to make sure that there is some accountability for safety of workers. And right now, that’s now where they are.”

The persistent disagreements have diminished the chances that the sides can reach a deal before the elections. And Trump, who has remained on the sidelines during the talks, has only muddled the debate.


The Hill’s Mike Lillis contributed to the contents of this report.